VIEWS OF PRAGUE from the hills and elsewhere

One of Prague’s best points is that it’s a city of hills and spectacular views. This week, we’ve put together a list of some of the best places to get up high, or not so high, and catch some amazing vistas of Prague that you can’t see from the Old Town Square. We’ve provided some example photos, map links, and all the transportation instructions you need to get to wherever looks best to you. Even better, quite often there’s beer and food to be found along the way. That’s Prague all over, so go out and get all over Prague. (Ha! How’s that for the cheesiest sentence I wrote all year?)

Letna Park ( Letenský Sady) is a good starting point. As promised above, it's complete with it's own infamous beer garden where you'll also find a food stand with everything from grilled sausage to hot vegetarian quiches.

Letna Park ( Letenský Sady) is a good starting point. As promised above, it’s complete with it’s own infamous beer garden where you’ll also find a food stand with everything from grilled sausage to hot vegetarian quiches. Get there at sunset and look towards the castle and you might see something like this photo. From the center, take trams 12, 14, 25 or 26 to stop Letenské Náměstí. Or if you feel like walking, just cross the bridge from Náměstí Republiky and follow the footpath and the stairs up the hill.

If you start in Letná Park at the beer garden, then walk in the direction of the castle (you can see it from there, no worries) along the top of the ridge and you'll be treated to a whole bunch of good views, like this one from the steps of the Prague Metronome.

If you start in Letná Park at the beer garden, then walk in the direction of the castle (you can see it from there, no worries) along the top of the ridge and you’ll be treated to a whole bunch of good views, like this one from the steps of the Prague Metronome.

If you keep going through Letná park for as far as you can, eventually you'll find a footbridge that crosses over a busy street with a tram line. On the other side of the bridge you'll find the Imperial Gardens, which are behind Prague Castle and lead to the castle's north gate. The gardens are separated from the castle by a narrow canyon called the Deer Moat (Jelení Příkop

If you keep going through Letná park for as far as you can, eventually you’ll find a footbridge that crosses over a busy street with a tram line. On the other side of the bridge you’ll find the Royal Gardens, which are behind Prague Castle and lead to the castle’s north gate. The gardens are separated from the castle by a narrow canyon called the Deer Moat (Jelení Příkop) which once served as one the castle’s main defences. From there you’ll get unique castle views that you can’t see from anywhere else.

And speaking of the Prague Castle, the views from there are also spectacular. This one is from the St. Wenceslas Vineyard which is just outside the castle's east gate.

And speaking of the Prague Castle, the views from there are also spectacular. This one is from the St. Wenceslas Vineyard which is just outside the castle’s east gate.

If you're standing anywhere in the center looking towards Prague Castle, just to the left of the castle, on the edge of Petřín Hill, you'll see the Strahov Monastery (pictured in the photo looming above the Malostrana district).

If you’re standing anywhere in the center looking towards Prague Castle, just to the left of the castle, on the edge of Petřín Hill, you’ll see the Strahov Monastery (pictured in the photo with its two towers looming above the Malostrana district). The view from up there is amazing. And to make it even better, the monastery operates a brewery that makes a number of different kinds of beer which are only served there on the premises. You can’t buy them anywhere else. The easiest way to get to the monastery is to take tram 22 or 23 to stop Pohořelec.

The view from Strahov Monastery looking back towards Prague Castle.

The view from Strahov Monastery looking back towards Prague Castle.

Even when the weather isn't great, the skies above Prague can still be dramatic and beautiful. From Strahov Monastery, you can walk directly into the upper reaches of Petřín Hill, a huge public park with fruit orchards, flower gardens, and of course a beer garden or two. Wander around Petřín and you'll find all kinds of good views.

Even when the weather isn’t great, the skies above Prague can still be dramatic and beautiful. From Strahov Monastery, you can walk directly into the upper reaches of Petřín Hill, a huge public park with fruit orchards, flower gardens, and of course a beer garden or two. Wander around Petřín and you’ll find all kinds of good views.

On the very top of Petřín is Petřín Tower, pictured here on the left side of the photo. The tower is open to the public, and if you're feeling motivated enough, from the top of it you'll get the best 360-degree view of the city that exists. Obviously on the day I took this photo, I wasn't feeling so motivated...

On the very top of Petřín is Petřín Tower, pictured here on the left side of the photo. The tower is open to the public, and if you’re feeling motivated enough to climb up all the stairs, from the top of it you’ll get the best 360-degree view of the city that exists. Obviously on the day I took this photo, I wasn’t feeling so motivated… But got climb up there yourself and be pleasant surprised. After you catch your breath.

The Petřín Tower is surrounded by lovely flower gardens. The easiest way to get up there is to take take tram 9, 12, or 22 to stop Ujezd. Walk up into the bottom of Petřín park, and you'll see the entrance to the Lanovka, or cable car, which will take you all the way up to the top of the hill and the gardens and the tower.

The Petřín Tower is surrounded by lovely flower gardens. The easiest way to get up there is to take take tram 9, 12, or 22 to stop Ujezd. Walk up into the bottom of Petřín park, and you’ll see the entrance to the Lanovka, or cable car, which will take you all the way up to the top of the hill and the gardens and the tower.

Take a walk with good view. You couldn't find a better city for it, and it doesn't cost anything. Climb to the of Vitkov hill and admire the scenery with Jan Žižka.

Another place with super a view is Vitkov, the hill which marks the northern boundary of the the district of Prague called Žižkov. On top of the hill is a statue of the Czech military hero Jan Žižka. You can get up there either by climbing the steps which lead up from the Army Museum near bus station Florenc, or by taking bus 207 to stop Ohrada. Across from the bus stop is a nice beer garden called Zahrádky Žižkov. After you pick up a beverage of your choice, leave through the back entrance and it will put you directly onto the access road that leads to the statue.

The view from the national monument on top of Vitkov.

The view from the national monument on top of Vitkov.

 

Another favorite open-air hangout is Riegrovy Sady and guess what. Yes! This park also has a beer garden. Kudos to the town planners for always making sure that the national beverage is always where you need it to be.

Another favorite open-air hangout is Riegrovy Sady and guess what. Yes! This park also has a beer garden. Kudos to the town planners for always making sure that the national beverage is always where you need it to be just in time for sunset. Take tram 5, 9, or 26 to stop Husinecká and walk up the hill till you find the edge of the park.

Sometimes you don't have to go up a hill at all to get some of the best views of Prague. Walking around on the banks of the river can give you some great looks too. Or rent a paddle boat on Střelecký Ostrov and admire the city from the water.

Sometimes you don’t have to go up a hill at all to get some of the best views of Prague. Walking around on the banks of the river can give you some great looks too. Or rent a paddle boat on Střelecký Ostrov and admire the city from the water.

- Photos by Mélanie Rada, Laura Ann, and Jeff Fritz

river bank 01

 

 

Jeff Fritz

I first came to the Czech Republic in 2004, and came to Prague to live in 2005. Since then, I've traveled all over the country and have spent almost as much time in the city as out of it, hiking the woods and mountains and attending open-air festivals. I spent 4.5 years working as a tour guide doing historical walks, brewery tours, ghost tours after dark, and acting as the beer master for a Czech beer tasting. Following that, I worked for 3 years as general manager of a large live-music venue in the Old Town, and 1.5 years as manager for a tea house and specialty beer bar in Letná. I have also worked as an actor, designer, and technical director for most of the English-language theatre companies in Prague. And my wife and I have been operating an independent theatre company here called Akanda since 2008. History, especially of Central and Eastern Europe, has been a passion of mine since university.

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