NORMALIZATION – what happened after 1968 Prague Spring occupation

We’ve already published a blog post about the 1968 Prague Spring, so this time you will learn what happened after. Those travellers, who participated on our special Communism & Bunker Tour, not only had the unique chance to visit a creepy nuclear shelter, but also to greet the Patron Saint of Czechs, King Wenceslas, who’s statue overlooks the Wenceslas

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It is believed that the King Wenceslas, the Patron Saint of Czechs, should safe the country from the danger. That's why people always gather bellow his statue in the Wenceslas Square and "call for help". He never showed up, obviously.

6 JULY: Jan Hus Day

In the middle of Old Town Square stands a large and imposing statue of one of Bohemia’s most important religious reformers and martyrs, Jan Hus (c.1370-1415). If you’ve been on a Prague Extravaganza Free Tour, then you might already know something about this significant historical figure and the 15-year-long cycle of Hussite Wars that was

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The Jan Hus memorial on Old Town Square, created by Czech sculptor Ladislav Šaloun in 1915, and dedicated on the 500th anniversary of the death of Hus.

How did former Czechoslovakia became part of the Eastern Bloc

The 20th century was particularly painful for the Czech nation. “Victorious February” (25th Feb 1948), was a government coup and complete takeover of the communists behind the steering wheel of Czechoslovakia. Background Communism as a philosophy emerged from the turmoil of the European industrial revolution, where the ordinary people were for the first time in

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How did Communists take over the former Czechoslovakia.

THE PRAGUE SPRING AND THE SOVIET INVASION OF 1968

In the late-night hours of 20-21 August, 1968, the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic was invaded by approximately 500,000 members of the combined armed forces of East Germany, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland lead by – who else? – the USSR. This military incursion was undertaken by the Warsaw Pact nations in order to put a stop to

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Peaceful obstruction and resistance to the Warsaw Pact invasion of 1968.

25 years of freedom

The 17th of November, the Czechs and Slovaks are celebrating the so-called Velvet Revolution – the peaceful demonstrations that ended the 41 years period of totalitarian communist rule. During those remarkable days, the opposition singers banned from their career for decades could sing to large crowds again and the Western world was zealously listening to

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The door of Iron Curtain finally opened after 1989.